Protecting this planet’s natural resources for future generations is a moral obligation; unfortunately, moral obligations do not pay the bills.  Coal is a nonrenewable resource that causes pollution. But it’s cheap. Renewable energy is often a more expensive alternative to using coal, oil, or natural gas to produce energy. Recognizing that renewable energy must be financially viable for individuals

In Part I of our series on the particulars of Green Leasing, we discussed Lease Term and Operating Expenses. Now we turn to a robust area for implementing sustainable processes between Landlords and Tenants:

Interior Alterations and Repairs

 

A typical commercial lease will have two separate sections, one on maintenance and repairs, and one on

A federal lawsuit in New York that involves Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations Act ("RICO") claims is one of the latest developments in the United States Green Building Council’s ("USGBC") development and administration of the LEED™ building ratings system.  The lawsuit appears highly contentious to say the least.  Plaintiffs Henry Gifford and Gifford Fuel Saving, Inc. initiated a class

Green building is quickly becoming the "norm" across America, and those who are not familiar with it could be missing important opportunities in today’s construction climate.  The United States Green Building Council ("USGBC") is a non-profit community of leaders working to make green buildings available to everyone.   USGBC developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental

The Ohio Department of Development has announced the availability of $8,000,000 in grant funding for qualifying energy efficiency projects undertaken at existing multi-family, commercial, and institutional buildings. The goal of the program is to encourage the installation of energy efficiency equipment that will measurably improve the energy efficiency of existing multi-family, commercial, and institutional buildings. The program

In the past, we have spoken about grants and loans available through the Ohio Department of Development for advanced energy residential projects, such as solar and wind energy installation.  Federal funding is also available for residential energy-reduction projects through The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).  A total of $250 Million from ARRA was allocated to HUD for its Assisted Housing Green Retrofit Program (GRP).  Under GRP, HUD is offering up to $15,000 per residential unit for projects that reduce energy costs, reduce water use, and improve indoor environmental quality.  HUD expects to fund about 25,000 units (approximately 300-350 properties), with an average $10,000 provided to each unit.

Beginning June 15, 2009, HUD is accepting applications for GRP funding on a first come, first served basis, and subject to allocations for project categories, geographic location and owner/affiliate concentration.  HUD may offer either a Green Retrofit Grant or a Green Retrofit Loan repayable from a share of surplus cash and from sale and refinancing proceeds.  The performance period for completing all Green Retrofits will generally be twelve (12) months, but in no event may it exceed twenty-four (24) months.  The program requirements differ depending on the type of project-based assistance contract and depending on the owner entity (nonprofit or for profit).

The properties eligible to receive GRP funding are the following: Section 202 funded properties that have at least 32 units; Section 811 funded properties that have at least 8 units; properties receiving assistance pursuant to Section 8 with USDA Section 515 loans and which have at least 20 units; and all other Section 8 funded properties having at least 72 units.

 


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