Recently, the Yellow Springs Village Council voted to adopt a “Community Bill of Rights” ordinance banning shale gas drilling and related activities in the village. The Bill of Rights declares the fundamental rights of residents to clean air and water, and to protect the rights of nature. 

Yellow Springs is the first municipality

Ohio and Kentucky statutes require residential builders to provide certain notice to home buyers.  While there is no new law on this, the construction attorneys of Ulmer & Berne LLP have seen this issue come to light many times this past year; thus, prompting this refresher alert on Ohio and Kentucky notice statutes.

Both Ohio and

Ohio House Bill 292, which prohibits the future creation of transfer fee covenants, was signed into law on June 14, 2010 and will become effective on September 13, 2010. Transfer fee covenants in effect prior to September 13, 2010 are not affected by the new law.

Transfer fee covenants create revenue streams for real estate

In the past, we have spoken about grants and loans available through the Ohio Department of Development for advanced energy residential projects, such as solar and wind energy installation.  Federal funding is also available for residential energy-reduction projects through The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).  A total of $250 Million from ARRA was allocated to HUD for its Assisted Housing Green Retrofit Program (GRP).  Under GRP, HUD is offering up to $15,000 per residential unit for projects that reduce energy costs, reduce water use, and improve indoor environmental quality.  HUD expects to fund about 25,000 units (approximately 300-350 properties), with an average $10,000 provided to each unit.

Beginning June 15, 2009, HUD is accepting applications for GRP funding on a first come, first served basis, and subject to allocations for project categories, geographic location and owner/affiliate concentration.  HUD may offer either a Green Retrofit Grant or a Green Retrofit Loan repayable from a share of surplus cash and from sale and refinancing proceeds.  The performance period for completing all Green Retrofits will generally be twelve (12) months, but in no event may it exceed twenty-four (24) months.  The program requirements differ depending on the type of project-based assistance contract and depending on the owner entity (nonprofit or for profit).

The properties eligible to receive GRP funding are the following: Section 202 funded properties that have at least 32 units; Section 811 funded properties that have at least 8 units; properties receiving assistance pursuant to Section 8 with USDA Section 515 loans and which have at least 20 units; and all other Section 8 funded properties having at least 72 units.

 

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